+ take a quick survey of our website!

Welcome | + home
      WHERE ARE YOU TRAVELING?

Get country overviews, detailed information including providers, recent alerts, and more for the countries you are visiting

Country Profile

Indonesia

Indonesia is an independent republic consisting of more than 17,500 islands spread over 3,400 miles along the Equator. The main islands are Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (Borneo), Sulawesi (Celebes), Papua, Halmahera, and Seram. The capital city of Jakarta lies in the lowlands of West Java, the most populated island. The country has approximately 245,500,000 people and more than 300 ethnic groups.Indonesia’s geographic location and topography make the country prone to natural disasters, especially seismic upheaval due to its location on the “Ring of Fire,” an arc of volcanoes and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.  Indonesia is a developing country with a growing economy and some infrastructure shortcomings.  However, it has many tourist destinations associated with the country’s cultural diversity and natural resources. Annually, approximately 150,000 U.S. tourists visit Indonesia.The U.S. diplomatic mission in Indonesia consists of approximately 220 American staff and 500 family members in addition to an average of 150 temporary duty officials who visit the Embassy each month.  See the Department of State Background Notes on Indonesia for additional information on the country.

Indonesia

   
News
 
Alerts
 
Providers
 
Reports
 
 
 MOST RECENT ALERTS
 There's no recent alert.

Image of Indonesia
 COUNTRY OVERVIEW
Country Name: Indonesia
Continent: Asia
Capital City: Jakarta
Boundary Countries: Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea
Recommended Hospitals in Capital: Siloam Gleneagles Hospital Lippo Karawaci (Tangerang, Bali International Medical Center, Denpasar General Hospital, Kasih Ibu Hospital, Prima Medika Hospital, Sanglah General Hospital, Rumah Sakit Advent Bandung Hospital, Siloam Gleneagles Hospital (Bekasi, Surabaya), Global Doctor International Medical Center (Jakarta), Medikaloka Health Care Center (Jakarta), Medistra Hospital (Jakarta), MMC Hospital (Jakarta), Pondok Indah Hospital (Jakarta), Rumah Sakit Jakarta, Siloam Graha Medika Hospital- Jakarta, Medan Adventist Hospital (Sumatra), Dr. Soetomo Hospital (Surabaya), Binatro International Hospital (Tangerang)
Main Cities: Jakarta, Surabaja, Medan, Bandung, Semarang
Country Size: 1,919,440 sq km
Population: 238,452,952

 

COUNTRY GENERAL INFORMATION
Language:

Bahasa Indonesia, English, Dutch

Currency: Indonesian rupiah (IDR)
Predominant Religions:

Bahasa,Indonesia,English, Dutch

National Holidays: Independance Day, 17 August (1945)
Economic Status:

Indonesia , A vast polyglot nation, has struggled t oovercome the Asian financial crisis, and still grapples with the persistant poverety and unemployment, inadequate infrastructure, endemic corruption, a fragile banking sector, a poor investment climate, and unequal resource distribution among regions. The country continues the slow work of rebuilding from the devastating December 2004 tsunami and from an earthquake in central Java in May 2006 that caused over $3 billion in damage and losses.

Security:

Indonesia Armed Forces (TNI), Army (TNI-AD), Navy (TNI-AL, including Marines, Naval Air arm), Air Force (TNI-AU)

US Presence:

The US Embassy is located in Jakarta at Medan Merdeka Selatan 5; tel: (62)(21) 3435-9000; fax (62)(21) 385-7189. The Embassy's web site is http://www.usembassyjakarta.org/. The consular section can be reached by e-mail at jakconsul@state.gov. To subscribe to the US Embassy Emergency Notification System, please register at http://jakarta.usembassy.gov/consular/ACSREGISTER.html

consurabaya@state.gov.; after-hours duty officer (62)(811)334-183. The consulate should be the first point of contact for Americans needing assistance who are present or residing in the Indonesian provinces of: East Java, Nusa Tenggara Timor, Nusa Tenggara Barat, all of Sulawesi and North and South Maluku.

There is a Consular Agency in Bali at Jalan Hayam Wuruk 188, Denpasar, Bali; telephone: (62)(361) 233-605; fax (62)(361) 222-426; e-mail: amcobali@indo.net.id. The US Consulate in Surabaya is an alternate contact for American citizens in Bali.

The US Consulate in Medan, North Sumatra, only provides emergency assistance to US citizens and does not yet have public consular hours. Americans citizens needing consular assistance in Sumatra should contact the US Embassy in Jakarta.

The US Consulate General in Surabaya is at Jalan Raya Dr. Sutomo 33; tel: (62)(31)295-6400; fax (62)(31) 567-4492; e-mail:

Document Requirements:

The Indonesian government requires visitors to have a passport valid for at least six months following the date of arrival. Indonesian authorities regularly deny entry to all foreign nationals who arrive with less than six months’ validity on their passports. The U.S. Embassy cannot obtain entry permission for Americans in this situation. Travelers will be required to depart for Singapore or a nearby country to obtain a new U.S. passport. Also, travelers to Indonesia who do not have the necessary six months’ validity remaining on their passports may be denied boarding at their point of origin or at a transit point enroute. It generally takes two weeks for a U.S. passport to be issued outside of the United States.

American citizens are required to have a visa to enter Indonesia. Tourist passport holders may apply for a non-extendable visitor Visa-on-Arrival at airports in Jakarta, Bali, Surabaya, Medan, Padang, Pekanbaru, Manado, Biak, Ambon, Balikpapan, Pontianak, Kupang, Batam, and South Sumatra. An onward/return ticket is required to apply for a Visa-on-Arrival at these Indonesian ports of entry. Visas-on-Arrival are unavailable at the Banda Aceh airport. Visas-on-Arrival are also available at a limited number of seaports, including the Batam and Bintan ferry terminals near Singapore, but are unavailable at any land border crossing. For complete details on Visas-on-Arrival and other visas please see http://www.embassyofindonesia.org/consular/voa.htm. Visas-on-Arrival are unavailable for travelers using diplomatic or official passports to enter Indonesia. .

Indonesian visas require an entirely blank passport page. Travelers without a blank visa page in their passport may be denied entry. See http://travel.state.gov/passport/fri/add/add_850.html to learn how to add extra visa pages.

U.S. citizens may also apply for a visa at the Indonesian Embassy in Washington DC, or at an Indonesian Consulate elsewhere in the U.S. In some cases, U.S. citizens may also apply at Indonesian embassies and consulates in other countries. U.S. citizens traveling overseas who wish to apply for an Indonesian visa should inquire with the local embassy in the country where they are currently traveling. For up-to-date Indonesian visa information, contact the Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia: 2020 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington DC 20036, phone: (202) 775-5200, or at Indonesian Consulates in Los Angeles (213) 383-5126; San Francisco (415) 474-9571; Chicago (312) 920-1880; New York (212) 879-0600; and Houston (713) 785-1691. Visit the Embassy of Indonesia website for the most current visa information.

Indonesia strictly enforces its immigration/visa requirements. Travelers who overstay visas on arrival are subject to a fine of U.S. $20 per day and other sanctions. Westerners, including Americans, have been jailed for visa violations and/or overstays. Violators may also be subject to substantial fines and/or deportation from Indonesia for immigration and visa violations. Immigration officials have also detained foreigners for conducting business, academic or other non-tourist activities while on visitor status. Volunteer work with local or international NGOs is not permitted while on visitor status. Penalties for such immigration/visa violations have included a prison sentence of up to 5 years and a fine of Rupiah 25 million. Travelers are encouraged to contact an Indonesian consular office to determine the appropriate visa category before traveling to Indonesia. Please consult the Criminal Penalties section below for further information.

All airline passengers, including children, are subject to a departure tax, which must be paid in Rupiah, cash only. The international departure tax as of November 2008 is 150,000 Rupiah in Jakarta and varies at other international airports. The domestic departure tax in Jakarta is 40,000 Rupiah, but this tax also varies by airport.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Indonesia.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

Major Airports:

Airports:  661, Airports w/paved runways:  154

Jakarta – Halim Perdanakusuma International Airport (HLP/WIHH)
Jakarta, Halim, Java, Indonesia, Room 244, 2nd Floor, Terminal Building, Bandara Halim Perdanakusuma, Jakarta Timur 13610, INDONESIA
Tel: +62 (0)21 8089 9599, +62 (0)21 809 1108, +62 (0)21 809 0913
Fax: +62 (0)21 809 3351
Website: www.ankasapura2.co.id
Customs, hours: 24 hours
Tel: +62 (0)21 809 1548, +62 (0)21 809 3619

Servicing Airlines:
Risks and Precautions:

Several terrorist attacks have occurred in Indonesia, including the most recent bombing at two beachfront restaurants in Bali in October 2005 that resulted in the deaths of 20 people.  Since 2005, the Indonesian police and security forces have disrupted a number of cells and arrested approximately 400 suspects linked with Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), a U.S. Department of State-designated terrorist organization.Extremists may target both official and private interests. Examples of such targets include high-profile sporting events, residential areas, business offices, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools, public areas, and locales where Americans or foreigners gather in large numbers.Indonesia to avoid crowds, maintain a low profile, and be vigilant about security at all times. Americans are advised to monitor local news broadcasts, vary their routes and times in carrying out daily activities, and consider the level of preventive security when visiting public places in Indonesia.

Mortality Statistics:

Infant MR total:  36.82 deaths/1,000 live births

Life expectancy at birth:  TOTAL 69.26yrs.(male 66.84/ female 71.8)

Immunization Indicators:

Required : None

Recommended :Hep A & B, Japanese Encephalitis, Rabies,Typhoid. Boosters:MMR, DPT,Polio

Infectious Disease Concerns:

degree of risk: high

Malaria risk throughout the country, except in Jakarta, resort areas of Bali and the island of Java, except for the Menoreh Hills in central Java.Dengue, filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, and plague are diseases carried by insects that also occur in this region. Polio has resurfaced in Indonesia. Rabies is common in the region and poses a risk to travelers.Do not swim in fresh water to avoid infection with schistosomiasis. Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection often contracted through recreational water activities in contaminated water, such as kayaking, is common in tropical areas of this region. An outbreak was reported among expedition travelers in 2000.

Overall Quality of Medical Services:

The general level of sanitation and health care in Indonesia is far below U.S. standards. Some routine medical care is available in all major cities, although most expatriates leave the country for serious medical procedures. 

Providers in Network:
Direct Payment: 23
Referrals: 66
View Network Providers
Recent Medical Threats/ Concerns/Warnings:

Malaria, dengue and other tropical and contagious diseases occur frequently in Indonesia. In 2005, polio re-emerged in Western Java.  Avian Influenza A (H5N1) is endemic among poultry in Indonesia and poultry outbreaks have been reported in the majority of Indonesia’s provinces.  While human cases of H5N1 remain extremely rare, more than 80 people have died of H5N1 in Indonesia since 2004.

Communications Info:

Phone Country Code: +62 
Internet Code: .id

 



© 2006-2019 Seven Corners Inc.+303 Congressional Blvd., Carmel, IN 46032+800-335-0611
Seven Corners is one of the industry's most experienced travel health insurance providers. The company serves leisure, student, business, government and missionary/volunteer travelers. It offers an extensive selection of international medical and travel insurance policies to U.S. citizens traveling overseas, or foreign nationals visiting the United States. Seven Corners has thousands of policy holders and a worldwide network of over 30,000 agents. The company created and maintains the industry's most comprehensive network of international health care providers that includes thousands of doctors, pharmacies and hospitals around the globe. Seven Corners is a member of the United States Travel Insurance Association; is GSA certified and is currently pursuing a SAS 70 Type II compliant designation. In addition to travel medical insurance, Seven Corners also offers health care administration to the government sector. The company is privately held and headquartered just north of Indianapolis in Carmel, IN.